PHOTO ALBUM: QUEEN HATSHEPSUT’S MORTUARY TEMPLE, LUXOR, EGYPT

One of the most potent attractions and enduring sights on the entire west bank of the Nile- the imposing, almost completely intact mortuary temple of one of ancient Egypt’s most legendary rulers- the great queen, Hatshepsut.

'Crouched in crook of death'... first view of the mortuary temple

‘Crouched in crook of death’… first view of the mortuary temple

Surrounding limestone ecarpments shelter the temple

Surrounding limestone ecarpments shelter the temple

Lower far side wing of the complex

Lower far side wing of the complex

Approaching the vast, silent complex on foot is an amazing experience

Approaching the vast, silent complex on foot is an amazing experience

Looking up to the nearside, second level

Looking up to the nearside, second level

'Silent in a sea of timeless limestone....'

‘Silent in a sea of timeless limestone….’

Ornate statues dedicated to Hatshepsut., looking out over the arid, dead lands of the west bank

Ornate statues dedicated to Hatshepsut., looking out over the arid, dead lands of the west bank

The surrounding scenery is literally unchanged for milennia

The surrounding scenery is literally unchanged for milennia

Close up of one of those amazing, ageless statues

Close up of one of those amazing, ageless statues

Looking along the upper level colonnade. The entire complex is something like 97 feet high in all

Looking along the upper level colonnade. The entire complex is something like 97 feet high in all

If this ancient, sun scorched columns could only talk...

If this ancient, sun scorched columns could only talk…

The shade of ageless stone columns was very welcome

The shade of ageless stone columns was very welcome

The sheer symmetry of the entire complex is awe inspiring

The sheer symmetry of the entire complex is awe inspiring

Another ground's eye view of the complex

Another ground’s eye view of the complex

Emblem of Horus, the Falcon god

Emblem of Horus, the Falcon god

One last, backwards glance...

One last, backwards glance…

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One comment

  1. Interesting how many of Hatshepsut’s “Osiride” statues at Deir el-Bahri have been restored. I believe originally every column on the upper terrace had one. When Menkheperre (Thutmose III) succeeded Hatshepsut, his agents smashed the statuary and buried the pieces in a trench in front of the temple.

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