ROME; WHAT’S IN A NAME?

If these walls could talk...

If these walls could talk…

Rome. One name. A million memories. The Eternal City. Endless images. What exactly is Rome to you?

Rome for me is the hulking, ruined grandeur of the Colosseum, stark and unyielding against an early autumn sunset. Every stone, pillar and archway has memories of desperate gladiator duels, animal fights and appalling ritual sacrifices seared into it. It seems to defy both time and the Gods themselves.

Rome is the smell of fresh, piping hot espresso and the zesty aroma of fresh, fragrant lemon trees in full bloom in the first, heady days of spring. It is sunset on the waters of the ageless, meandering Tiber, and an early evening stroll across one of the ancient bridges that still vaults that serpentine span.

Rome is the jagged, stunted remnants of shorn doric columns, glinting eerily in the noonday sun that washes the scarred, silent expanse of the Forum. The same sun that once glinted on the blades of the daggers of Brutus and Cassius as they bathed this same soil in Caesar’s blood.

The magnificent Pantheon

The magnificent Pantheon

Rome is the sight and sound of  masses of motor scooters, buzzing like hordes of maddened wasps as they swarm heedlessly past the balcony from where the strutting, meat headed Il Duce once harangued the increasingly sullen crowds. It is the cool, ordered magnificence of Bernini’s stunning, colonnaded courtyard as it  sweeps up to the serene, ordered symmetry of Piazza San Pietro. It is the intricate, impossible, frescoed real estate of the Sistine Chapel ceiling. And the brooding, turreted bulwarks of Castel Sant Angelo, where more than one pope sought refuge in the Middle Ages .

Rome is the bustling cafe society of Piazza Navona and its riot of impossibly ornate fountains. Rome is cold, crisp wine on a warm summer night, sitting under illuminated plane trees and watching la dolce vita unfurl all around you like some impossibly exquisite Caravaggio painting.

Above all, Rome is, truly, eternal. A city that was once the centre of the greatest empire the world had ever known; a magician’s conjuring trick that reinvented itself to become the focal point for one of the world’s greatest religions. A city that embraced modernity, and then framed it in the context of its own matchless, exalted past. A stunning juxtaposition of the ancient and the modern; the sensational and the effortlessly, eternally serene.  A moody, Machiavellian style melting pot that inspired Michelangelo and infuriated Mussolini. A city so mesmerising and sweeping in historical scope and treasures that even the retreating German army balked at vandalising it in 1944, defying Hitler’s direct orders to destroy it completely.

Tutti di Trevi.....

Tutti di Trevi…..

Rome is Trevi. It is Audrey Hepburn on a scooter in Sabrina. Rome is laughing children eating gelato on the Spanish Steps in the summertime.

These are just a few of my own mental images of this swaggering, majestic city. What is Rome to you?

FIVE MUST SEE SIGHTS FOR AMERICANS IN SOUTHERN EUROPE

Sagrada Familia, Barcelona

Sagrada Familia, Barcelona

The whole thing with southern Europe is that it is one vast, cake rich, cultural glut of incredible things to see. Castles, cathedrals, museums. Turrets, campaniles and spires. They all vie- nay, sometimes demand- your undivided attention on any given day of your European vacation.

Simple truth? You can’t do them all. So don’t even try. More truth? Not all of the truly great, awe inspiring sights are of human construction.

That point made, here’s five of my favourite places in the Mediterranean. With time, tide and fair breezes, they might just become some of yours, too.

Church of Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain

Antonio Gaudi was a creative genius on a par with Warhol or Hans Christian Andersen, and the still incomplete Sagrada Familia church is without doubt his most stunning masterpiece. With it’s clutch of gingerbread spires clawing at a perfect Catalan sky, it has become the symbol of one of the greatest, most swaggering and stylish cities in the world.

In places, it has the appearance of a slowly melting cake, inlaid just above ground level with some of the most amazing and intricate carvings you will ever see.  There is literally no other church like it in the world. During the day, this honey coloured colossus enjoys a matchless stance by a small park, but try to catch it at night. Indirect lighting, built all around it makes Sagrada Familia truly unforgettable and awe inspiring. You don’t have to be of any religious persuasion to be awed by this stunning testament to human devotion and ingenuity,  Highly recommended.

Villefranche, Cote D'Azur

Villefranche, Cote D’Azur

Bay of Villefranche, Villefranche-Sur-Mer, France

A sensuous, semi circular sweep of high, rolling hills studded with million euro villas, Villefranche is the most stunning single coastal location anywhere in southern Europe; one so perfectly formed that it was used as the backdrop for a James Bond film in the 1980’s.  At the edge of the quay, a row of Italianate shops, bars and restaurants in shades of blue, ochre and terracotta curves seductively around the lower edge of the bay. Umbrella shaded bars and pavement cafes spill out onto the quay that overlooks an azure harbour, studded with literally dozens of idly bobbing yachts and fishing boats. It’s a place to kick back and people watch over a sumptuous, two hour lunch, You’ll see people wearing sun glasses worth the entire national debt of a third world country, and old ladies walking impossibly small dogs among the jasmine wreathed cobbled streets that lead up into the old town.

Once seen, never forgotten; Villefranche will stay with you long after you leave it behind.

Greco-Roman Theatre, Taormina, Sicily

This almost perfectly preserved, Eighth Century amphitheatre is as compelling for its location as it is for it’s ageless, elegant sweep and still flawless acoustics. Nestling in the shade of towering pine trees at the top of Taormina, it looks down and out over the sparkling blue carpet of the Mediterranean. From it’s terraces, you can clearly see the brooding, still smouldering mass of Mount Etna, grey against a cobalt blue sky.

It has an exalted, almost Olympian feel to it; row upon row of stepped, circular stone seating cascades down to a central ‘stage’ which is still used for outdoor concerts to this day.

Worth going to simply for the view alone; an outdoor concert at dusk would be a truly amazing experience as well.

Piazza Navona, Rome, Italy

One of the scenic exclamation marks in a city almost awash with them, Piazza Navona has been a Roman stand out for centuries.

The centre piece is formed by a series of amazing, medieval fountains by Bernini, almost awash with a riot of intricate, over the top, Romanesque statuary from the middle ages. Off to one side is the cool, ordered elegance of the circular Pantheon, with its shady interior, incredible frescoes and marvellous acoustics.

These fountains and surrounding buildings form the focal point of this famous, frantic, bustling square that hums with life at all hours of the day and night. The whole area is framed by a host of sun splashed cafes and restaurants, while mime artists and strolling musicians mingle with dog walking locals taking time out for an ice cream.

It’s a quintessential Italian slice of the good life; la dolce vita served up with age old Roman style in a swaggering, feel good setting. Deliciously over the top, and typically addictive.

Windmills of Mykonos

Windmills of Mykonos

Windmills of Chora, Mykonos, Greek Islands

No other single sight is as evocative of the history and hedonism of the Greek Islands as those five famous windmills that sit on top of the hill above the harbour of Mykonos, immortalised in the movie, Shirley Valentine. They can be seen from any part of the island, and the views of the sunsets from here draws out the crowds each and every night in the peak summer season. It’s an almost pagan ritual, as compelling as anything you’ll see at Stonehenge. The vibe at evening time has more than a little in common with Key West.

Individually, each of the five windmills has a uniform stance. Circular and whitewashed, surrounded by low stone walls and fronted by petrified, long silent sails, each is topped with it’s own thatched ‘mop top’ roof.  It is their collective poise and presence that makes them so memorable; they loom above the Aegean’s most compelling and indulgent island like a quintet of benevolent deities.

So; there you go. Five of my faves from the magnificent Med. You may agree. You may disagree. But I think we’d all agree that the real fun lies in getting out there, and finding and defining your own favourites, Happy exploring!