A DAY IN DUBROVNIK

Arriving at the old town by tender

Arriving at the old town by tender

The familiar old port is still busy in summertime
The familiar old port is still busy in summertime

The old city walls have been bleached white by centuries of red hot summers

The old city walls have been bleached white by centuries of red hot summers

Dubrovnik is almost completely intact, a medieval time capsule in stone and marble

Dubrovnik is almost completely intact, a medieval time capsule in stone and marble

Stradun, the ancient main thoroughfare of the city

Stradun, the ancient main thoroughfare of the city

Stradun's pavements are marble, and hellish deadly when wet

Stradun’s pavements are marble, and hellish deadly when wet

Fortunately, they don't get wet too often in summer

Fortunately, they don’t get wet too often in summer

The Pile Gate dates from the fourteenth century

The Pile Gate dates from the fourteenth century

The ramparts of the city make for an amazing contrast with that petrol blue sky

The ramparts of the city make for an amazing contrast with that petrol blue sky

Onofrio fountain traces it's storied history back to the 1300's

Onofrio fountain traces it’s storied history back to the 1300’s

The Venetian influence on the city is obvious here

The Venetian influence on the city is obvious here

The tales those stones could tell...

The tales those stones could tell…

Even the carvings on these corniches is amazing

Even the carvings on these corniches is amazing

And it's back to the old port

And it’s back to the old port

Taking in the coastline from the deck of the Silver Spirit- sheer bliss

Taking in the coastline from the deck of the Silver Spirit- sheer bliss

 

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INDOLENT IBIZA- A DAYTIME SPENT STROLLING THROUGH THE TOWN

Looking out over the Mediterranean

Looking out over the Mediterranean

The solid ramparts of the old castle
The solid ramparts of the old castle

Inside the tunnels leading up to the castle

Inside the tunnels leading up to the castle

Frozen in time

Frozen in time

The old garrison quarters

The old garrison quarters

This shot gives some idea of the scale of the upper part of the old town

This shot gives some idea of the scale of the upper part of the old town

This is the older, more weathered part of the citadel

This is the older, more weathered part of the citadel

View down over the ramparts, towards Formentera

View down over the ramparts, towards Formentera

Another shot out over the summertime Med

Another shot out over the summertime Med

Ibiza's hilltop cathedral

Ibiza’s hilltop cathedral

View out over the yacht harbour

View out over the yacht harbour

The blue and the green

The blue and the green

Ibiza is full of sweet spots like this

Ibiza is full of sweet spots like this

The top pf the hill....

The top pf the hill….

Summertime Ibiza Town is a blaze of glorious colours

Summertime Ibiza Town is a blaze of glorious colours

People are often surprised at how gorgeous the town is

People are often surprised at how gorgeous the town is

The architecture is typical right through all the Balearic Islands

The architecture is typical right through all the Balearic Islands

The Middle Ages saw forts like this spring up all over the Med

The Middle Ages saw forts like this spring up all over the Med

The tales those walls could tell...

The tales those walls could tell…

The yacht harbour is a glorious contrast in styles and colour

The yacht harbour is a glorious contrast in styles and colour

The castle and cathedral, seen from the harbour

The castle and cathedral, seen from the harbour

 

INSIDE LE SEU CATHEDRAL- THE CROWN JEWEL OF PALMA DE MALLORCA

Le Seu cathedral dominates the skyline of Palma

Le Seu cathedral dominates the skyline of Palma

It measures 121 metres long, is 55 metres wide, and has a height of 44 metres
It measures 121 metres long, is 55 metres wide, and has a height of 44 metres

Work on the cathedral began back in 1229

Work on the cathedral began back in 1229

But it was not officially completed until 1601

But it was not officially completed until 1601

The buttresses showcase a distinctly Romanesque frame

The buttresses showcase a distinctly Romanesque frame

We were allowed to photograph the cavernous interior

We were allowed to photograph the cavernous interior

The view from one end down to the other is stunning

The view from one end down to the other is stunning

The huge window at the centre is the largest of its kind in the world

The huge window at the centre is the largest of its kind in the world

This illustrates the sheer scale of Le Seu

This illustrates the sheer scale of Le Seu

The altar

The altar

Ceiling supports are immense

Ceiling supports are immense

Another long shot

Another long shot

Amazing

Amazing

Transcept

Transcept

Some later additions were made by Antonio Gaudi

Some later additions were made by Antonio Gaudi

These were done over thirteen years, from 1901 through 1914

These were done over thirteen years, from 1901 through 1914

Touches of whimsy in an otherwise staid, if majestic structure

Touches of whimsy in an otherwise staid, if majestic structure

Le Seu remains imperious and ageless

Le Seu remains imperious and ageless

The centuries have largely passed Le Seu by

The centuries have largely passed Le Seu by

This is the original shell of the complex

This is the original shell of the complex

The quality of the work is both delicate and amazingly durable

The quality of the work is both delicate and amazingly durable

The interior courtyard is amazing

The interior courtyard is amazing

Another courtyard shot

Another courtyard shot

Fabulous medieval architecture of Le Seu

Fabulous medieval architecture of Le Seu

Another courtyard angled shot

Another courtyard angled shot

And one last one to conclude our visit to magnificent, majestic Le Seu!

And one last one to conclude our visit to magnificent, majestic Le Seu!

STREET SCENES FROM PALMA DE MALLORCA- A PHOTO ESSAY

The approach to Le Seu cathedral's long seafront promenade

The approach to Le Seu cathedral’s long seafront promenade

Water fountain near the cathedral
Water fountain near the cathedral

Le Seu, the Gothic cathedral that dominates the Palma skyline

Le Seu, the Gothic cathedral that dominates the Palma skyline

Tunnels of the old town

Tunnels of the old town

The side streets are narrow, and tend to be lined with high sandstone buildings

The side streets are narrow, and tend to be lined with high sandstone buildings

These are some of the coolest places in the city. Literally.

These are some of the coolest places in the city. Literally.

The shade from the midsummer sun was very welcome

The shade from the midsummer sun was very welcome

A lot of streets have marble floors in places

A lot of streets have marble floors in places

These cool, beautiful courtyards were everywhere

These cool, beautiful courtyards were everywhere

Latticed balconies like these were common to many houses

Latticed balconies like these were common to many houses

Typical Mallorcan door knocker

Typical Mallorcan door knocker

Beauty like this was around every corner

Beauty like this was around every corner

These parts have distinctly Moorish echoes

These parts have distinctly Moorish echoes

Another of those cool, cloistered courtyards

Another of those cool, cloistered courtyards

These giant mannequins feature a lot in Mallorcan folklore

These giant mannequins feature a lot in Mallorcan folklore

And more Mallorcan nigthmares

And more Mallorcan nigthmares

The seafront promenade has some beautiful waterfront parks and gardens

The seafront promenade has some beautiful waterfront parks and gardens

Another view of those gardens

Another view of those gardens

The grace and grandeur of cool, classy Palma

The grace and grandeur of cool, classy Palma

 

MORE PICTURES FROM ABOARD THE EUROPA 2

Lounging areas abound on the stylish Europa 2

Lounging areas abound on the stylish Europa 2

Cuisine on board was unfailingly fabulous
Cuisine on board was unfailingly fabulous

Outdoor lido buffet, Europa 2

Outdoor lido buffet, Europa 2

Caviar starter to a stunning alfresco dinner

Caviar starter to a stunning alfresco dinner

And dessert was no let down, either

And dessert was no let down, either

Sunset, Europa 2 style

Sunset, Europa 2 style

Zanzibar terrace at sunset

Zanzibar terrace at sunset

Outdoors under the Magrodome

Outdoors under the Magrodome

Dancing on deck

Dancing on deck

Pool deck at night

Pool deck at night

Quite a lively night was had

Quite a lively night was had

Parasols and pool lighting

Parasols and pool lighting

Upper deck styling is stunning as well

Upper deck styling is stunning as well

Upper deck sun loungers

Upper deck sun loungers

Upper deck Belvedere Lounge.located right forward

Upper deck Belvedere Lounge.located right forward

Belvedere Lounge

Belvedere Lounge

 

EUROPA 2 PHOTO GALLERY

Suite interior

Suite interior

Suite bedroom
Suite bedroom

Lobby bar

Lobby bar

Elegant fixtures are evident everywhere

Elegant fixtures are evident everywhere

The embarkation lobby

The embarkation lobby

Corridors are cool and clean of line

Corridors are cool and clean of line

Another lobby shot

Another lobby shot

This corridor shows the use of circular and linear alignment that typifies the entire ship

This corridor shows the use of circular and linear alignment that typifies the entire ship

The Herrenzimmer, or smoking room

The Herrenzimmer, or smoking room

Backlit bar fixture

Backlit bar fixture

The ship is typified by beautiful light fixtures

The ship is typified by beautiful light fixtures

The theatre

The theatre

Central lobby vestibule

Central lobby vestibule

Everywhere the design is strikingly hotel modern

Everywhere the design is strikingly hotel modern

Jacuzzi in the aft facing Ocean Spa

Jacuzzi in the aft facing Ocean Spa

Foot baths in the spa

Foot baths in the spa

Recliners in the spa

Recliners in the spa

Pebble foot baths in the spa

Pebble foot baths in the spa

Light fixtures in the Europa 2 entrance lobby

Light fixtures in the Europa 2 entrance lobby

Hour glass style light fittings are superb

Hour glass style light fittings are superb

Central pool area, with the Magrodome roof open

Central pool area, with the Magrodome roof open

Balinese beds on the upper level of the Pool Deck
Balinese beds on the upper level of the Pool Deck

View from the upper level, down to the pool

View from the upper level, down to the pool

 

Pool and palms

Pool and palms

Pool deck vista

Pool deck vista

Zanzibar indoor/outdoor nightclub lounge area

Zanzibar indoor/outdoor nightclub lounge area

Zanzibar pool bar

Zanzibar pool bar

Pool level view

Pool level view

Typical stair tower styling throughout the Europa 2

Typical stair tower styling throughout the Europa 2

Embarkation lobby on Europa 2

Embarkation lobby on Europa 2

 

 

LONDON PANORAMA- A WALKING TOUR OF SOME CITY HIGHLIGHTS

The Houses Of Parliament at daybreak

The Houses Of Parliament at daybreak

Entrance to Lambeth Palace
Entrance to Lambeth Palace

Entrance to the Imperial War Museum

Entrance to the Imperial War Museum

Fifteen inch naval guns on display at the museum entrance

Fifteen inch naval guns on display at the museum entrance

Side elevation of the guns. One is from HMS Resolution, the other from HMS Royal Sovereign

Side elevation of the guns. One is from HMS Resolution, the other from HMS Royal Sovereign

Side elevation of Lambeth Palace, traditional home of the Archbishops of Canterbury

Side elevation of Lambeth Palace, traditional home of the Archbishops of Canterbury

Parliament in the early morning light

Parliament in the early morning light

The famous London Eye

The famous London Eye

The Tattershall Castle, a floating bar/restaurant now moored on the Embankment

The Tattershall Castle, a floating bar/restaurant now moored on the Embankment

Rainy day bridges on the Thames

Rainy day bridges on the Thames

The huge new London Shard

The huge new London Shard

HMS Belfast, moored on the Thames

HMS Belfast, moored on the Thames

Tower Bridge, with the walkways lowered

Tower Bridge, with the walkways lowered

Traitor's Gate, Tower Of London

Traitor’s Gate, Tower Of London

Outer walls of the Tower Of London

Outer walls of the Tower Of London

White Tower, Tower Of London

White Tower, Tower Of London

Close up of the White Tower

Close up of the White Tower

The dome of Saint Paul's Cathedral

The dome of Saint Paul’s Cathedral

Entrance to the world famous Savoy Hotel

Entrance to the world famous Savoy Hotel

Nelson'c Column, Trafalgar Square

Nelson’s Column, Trafalgar Square

Base of Trafalgar Square fountains

Base of Trafalgar Square fountains

Trafalgar Square lion

Trafalgar Square lion

TIMESLIP: THE MAIDEN CROSSING OF THE SS. FRANCE, FEBRUARY 1962

The France at speed. probably on her trial runs out of Saint Nazaire

The France at speed. probably on her trial runs out of Saint Nazaire

When the France was laid down in 1958 as the long term replacement for the ageing Liberte, more than 1.2 million passengers still crossed the Atlantic by sea each year, either on business or pleasure. But that same October, the first ever Pan Am jet airliner flew eastwards across the Atlantic in just six hours, and the apple cart was not so much upset, as reduced to matchwood and splinters.

By the time of her launch just two years later, those same jets had more than seventy per cent of the transatlantic trade, and those numbers were climbing as steadily as a Boeing 707 cleared for take off. So by the time that the France was finally ready for her first passengers at the beginning of 1962, a huge amount was riding on her, both figuratively and literally.

The France was the last true Atlantic liner, designed to make thirty four round trips a year between Europe and America, with  no thought whatsoever being given to ever using her as a cruise ship. She was every bit as much of an Atlantic thoroughbred as the Normandie before her and, to the French, she was intended to be every bit as much a national showpiece as that fabled thirties showstopper. Though her actual cost was astronomical- the American press was already referring to her as ‘an eighty million dollar gamble’- the French invested far more in her in terms of emotional currency.

But this maritime Joan Of Arc (a perhaps unfortunate comparison when considering how many French liners were actually lost to fire) was to turn out to be more of a gilded Canute, fighting valiantly to stem the unstoppable. All the same, she was almost ready by the dawn of 1962 and, prior to her maiden crossing to New York, the French Line decided to send her on a nine day, trial run of a cruise down to the Canary IslandsIt was an idea taken up again by Cunard, when they introduced the brand new QE2 into service in early 1969.

This trial voyage sailed from Le Havre on January 19th, 1962 and, while it was a good exercise in PR, it also served to highlight the numerous potential shortcomings of the France as a cruise ship. It was the equivalent of expecting a premier league centre forward to switch to rugby league, and perform at the same level. These shortcomings- mainly revolving around a lack of outdoor deck space and her glass enclosed swimming pools- would only be permanently addressed during her 1979-80 conversion into the Norway at Bremerhaven.

However, the cruise did serve to demonstrate the excellence of her machinery. The France was the second fastest ocean liner ever built but, with the jets thundering overhead at five hundred miles an hour, any attempt at a tilt for the speed record, held for the past ten years by the SS.United States, was quietly ruled out. The France was expected to excel on an entirely different level.

Finally, at 1400 on the afternoon of February 3rd, 1962, Commandant Georges Croisiele took the flag bedecked France clear of the dock at Le Havre, to begin her maiden crossing to New York. Among the capacity load of 1,958 passengers on board was Madame Yvonne De Gaulle, wife of the president. She was making the voyage in her official capacity as the Godmother of the ship. The young actress, Juliette Greco, was also on the roster.

February was hardly a typical time for a gala maiden voyage, and the Atlantic slammed the new liner with a series of savage, forty five foot waves that forced Croisile to reduce speed from thirty knots right down to six at the height of the gale. That said, the only casualties were a slightly dented anchor housing, one broken window in the first class library and, perhaps most distressingly, some eight bottles of premium scotch. The passengers responded with typical panache, by adapting the dance steps to the brand new ‘twist’ craze to suit the weather conditions and, despite this vicious baptism of fire, France and her surviving, happily ample supply of scotch were able to make up the lost time. She duly arrived off Quarantine in New York on schedule on February 8th, 1962.

The welcome was as warm as the day itself was bitterly cold. A quartet of fire boats arced vast, icy plumes of water into the air all around the France as the last great French liner swept proudly towards her berth; this was the exact same pier where her predecessor, Normandie, had burned and sank some twenty years minus one day before. The arrival date can hardly have been a coincidence.

Prophetic, indeed. The France tied up at Pier 88, Manhattan, at the same spot where the Normandie burned and sank.

Prophetic, indeed. The France tied up at Pier 88, Manhattan, at the same spot where the Normandie burned and sank.

A flotilla of tugs and small pleasure craft rode shotgun around the new ship as she proceeded in state past the Battery. Helicopters buzzed her like random, curious dragonflies, filming the event for posterity. Crowds shivered along the freezing banks of the Hudson and banners snapped in the icy breeze as the soaring flank of the France kissed the edge of Pier 88 for the first time. Despite the adverse conditions encountered on the crossing, the France had, indeed, performed flawlessly.

The subsequent press conference held on board was a curious mixture of euphoria and tempered wisdom. The owners stated that ‘the captain is satisfied with his ship- and the ship is satisfied with her captain.’ They then went on to enshrine her as ‘the last refuge of the good life.’

At the same time, the multi millionaire Charles Cloredisembarking from the France, took occasion to deny to the assembled press that he was planning to buy the Cunard Line.

The press were in general, enchanted and awed by the stunning new ship, but elements of it did reiterate the ‘eighty million dollar gamble’ epithet in their subsequent coverage. They also questioned the fact that the huge beam of the liner made her too large to transit the Panama Canal

That drew a classic, Machiavellian retort from no less than General De Gaulle himself, back in France. He said flatly that ‘the ship is not too big; the problem is that the canal is too small.’ In his grandiosity, Monsieur Le President also conveniently forgotten (or ignored) the fact that the dimensions of the Panama Canal had actually been decided by another determined Frenchman, Ferdinand De Lesseps.

CHILDREN OF THE MERSEY; LUSITANIA AND MAURETANIA

The Mauretania was a famous 'Child of the Mersey' in her early days

The Mauretania was a famous ‘Child of the Mersey’ in her early days

In the annals of legendary, long gone Atlantic liners, few names are as steeped in lore as those of Lusitania and Mauretania. Conceived as a unique combination of pace and grace, they were intended to be complementary but, inevitably, the two ships became engaged in a kind of friendly rivalry. Both also became caught in the cross hairs of German periscopes in time, in circumstances that no one could ever have envisaged. One was to survive by the skin of her teeth; the second would become the victim of one of the most ghastly and controversial disasters in maritime history.

They were built with government money, on a tidal wave of jingoistic pressure. Britain, the owner of the greatest empire that the world had ever seen, was in possession of the world’s largest merchant marine at the turn of the twentieth century. But in 1897, that long unchallenged maritime dominance was given a rude slap.

That year, a brand new German four stacker called the Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse went thundering across the Atlantic, and seized the speed record- the mythical Blue Ribband- on her maiden crossing. The British were thunderstruck. But even worse was to follow.

One after another, three more successive record breakers emerged from German yards, and each one took the speed record in its turn. The advent of that Teutonic triple play was a real smack across Britannia’s imperial face. The upstart Germans had thrown down a four fingered gauntlet, and it was picked up with something of a snarl.

At the same time, an American railroad magnate named J.P. Morgan began buying up transatlantic shipping lines, one after the other, with the intent of creating the world’s first transatlantic travel megalith, an organisation that would have been the equivalent to the Oneworld Alliance of its day. He named it the International Mercantile Marine (IMM). The jewel in the crown of IMM was none other than Cunard’s great British rival, the White Star Line.

The birth of this corporate beast launched a deep and unpleasant fear in the minds of the British government. The thinking went that, in times of war, it might be impossible for these American owned ships to be employed in the service of the Empire. And, with the real possibility that Cunard, too, might also fall into Morgan’s bottomless money pit, something clearly had to give.

In fact, Cunard had judged the entire situation very smartly, and it now proceeded to play the British government as deftly as a baby grand piano. A gigantic loan of £2,600,000 was secured, with which it was to build a pair of world beating new transatlantic liners. These would later become the Lusitania and the Mauretania.

Naturally, there were strict conditions. Cunard had to guarantee to remain a British company. Plus, the two ships would be constructed to naval standards, with very extensive watertight compartments, and specially strengthened decks, capable of carrying six inch guns. For, in the event of a war, it was intended that the two ships would serve as auxiliary cruisers; cruisers much bigger than any bona fide battleship then in existence.

And, more importantly, the new ships would be expected to beat the speedy new German liners. And soundly, at that……

From the start, they were intended to be the biggest ships in the world. So big, in fact, that they had to be built in separate shipyards; the Lusitania on the Clyde, and the Mauretania on the Tyne. This in part explains the fierce but friendly rivalry that would exist between them, right up until the outbreak of the Great War.

At around 32,000 tons each, ‘Lusy’ and ‘Maurey’ had the inestimable advantage of being the recipients of the radical, reliable new steam turbine technology. It gave each of the two ships an unparalleled power plant, as would soon become obvious. For Cunard was aiming for an incredibly ambitious, average crossing time of five days for each ship.

The twins were breathtaking visions to behold; long, lean and graceful, with no nonsense, knife edge prows and a superstructure topped by a quartet of raked smokestacks, garlanded in the traditional Cunard colours of red and black. First to emerge was the Lusitania, in September of 1907. On her second round trip from Liverpool to New York, she set a new record for the Blue Ribband, restoring the coveted title to British care after a decade long hiatus.

Three months later, the Mauretania finally came on line. She had almost shaken herself to pieces on her first trial runs out of the Tyne, and some drastic internal stiffening had been in order before she could make a stormy November debut that same year. Once settled in, she also quickly beat the record just set by her sister. For the first time in ten years, a supremely dominant British duo was once again top dog on the lucrative New York run and, as the owners of that title, the two ships prospered mightily.

For the next seven years, the Lusy and Maurey would play ping pong with the Blue Ribband, beating each other now and again by a fraction of a knot. Both were sumptuously decorated in first class at least, with two story dining rooms, and salons more reminiscent of the Adlon than an ocean liner. Resplendent with deep, richly carved woods (Mauretania) or awash with gilt, Louis XVI furnishings and gold leaf (Lusitania), they were the absolute epitome of style, grace and grandeur on the often stormy Atlantic crossing.

That crossing was often a rocky road to be sure. With hull shapes dictated by naval architects, the two ships became famous for their pitching and rolling in bad weather. They had long, lean cruiser hulls, narrow in the beam, and not ideally suited for express service on the most unforgiving ocean in the world.

Yet they were instant, spectacular successes. So much so, in fact, that they ushered in a whole new age of rivalry on the Atlantic crossing, one that not even the most infamous disaster in maritime history could end.

For the White Star Line was not about to take this Cunard double sweep lying down. With J.P. Morgan’s almost limitless millions behind it, that company began plotting a giant triple response. First, there would be two new liners, built side by side, later to be followed by a third. Each of these ships would be half as large again as the pair of record breaking new Cunarders.

But the new White Star ships were not built to compete in terms of speed. Coal was expensive, and every knot over the first twenty used up as much coal as that original twenty did. These ships were designed to cross the Atlantic in six days, as opposed to the five day Cunard crossings. Each would be suffused with such a wealth of spectacular luxury and time killing diversions that the extra day at sea would be seen as a positive pleasure. Steadiness, safety, and splendid food and accommodations were the keynotes of the trio. As the first two ships took shape in Belfast, Cunard kept a wary eye on them, even as Lusy and Maurey continued to dominate the Atlantic crossing.

The first of these ships was, of course, the Olympic. As she made her first, triumphant entry into New York in the summer of 1911, the Lusitania was heading downstream, en route for the Coronation celebrations for King George V. Moving smartly down the Hudson, the Lusitania deigned to join in with the noisy salute being accorded to the new White Star liner.

The Olympic became the first of the mega liners to sail regularly from Southampton. Against better judgement, Cunard continued to favour Liverpool as i’s principal port; both Lusy and Maurey would continue to sail from there right up until the outbreak of war in 1914. More than once, they had broken loose from their moorings during severe Mersey stormssometimes suffering hull damage sufficiently bad enough to necessitate urgent dry docking. It was an anything but ideal situation.

As far as travel was concerned, the Olympic quickly creamed off the American travelling elite, though the British aristocracy in general continued to favour the faster Cunard duo. Part of this American fixation with White Star was that its ships called in regularly at Cherbourg, an ideal French port of call that put Paris and the French Riviera within easy reach by fast Pullman train. It was a lead that Cunard itself was to follow after the war.

Then, in the spring of 1912, the second of the White Star ships emerged. Five days into her maiden voyage, the hull of the Titanic glanced against the side of a capsized iceberg for around thirty seconds. She foundered less than three hours later, taking more than fifteen hundred people down with her, as well as a huge chunk of the New York Stock Exchange.

The shock effect was seismic. In the wake of a raft of investigations, both the Lusitania and Mauretania continued in service, albeit with strings of extra lifeboats now festooned along the whole length of their boat decks. Until then, the Cunarders- just like every other major ocean liner in service anywhere- had been just as woefully deficient in terms of lifeboat capacity as the ill fated Titanic.

This sudden, belatedly commendable obsession with boats for all would prove totally inadequate for the screaming thousands trapped on the sinking Lusitania as her shattered corpse sagged headlong into the Atlantic on May 7th, 1915, after her torpedoing just ten miles off the coast of Southern Ireland. But that is a story for another time; for now, this is where we leave the two sisters ships.

PANAMA AT 100; SOME CRUISE OPTIONS FOR 2014

Legend Of The Seas is offering Panama Canal cruises in 2014

Legend Of The Seas is offering Panama Canal cruises in 2014

2014 is a big year for anniversary travel, especially bearing in mind the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings and, from a land based side, the centenary of the Great War, But it is also the centenary of the opening of the Panama Canal, the waterway that cut the journey time between Atlantic and Pacific from weeks to hours.

Panama was a waterway that literally changed history. One of the most desperate. last ditch Japanese plans for changing the course of the Second World War centered around a submarine launched bombing raid on it that never came to pass. When the passage hewn at such ghastly human cost opened in 1914, the long, perilous voyage around the tip of South America became a thing of the past, and the tempo of east-west trade changed forever.

Literally tens of thousands of lives were lost to malaria and yellow fever in the jungle shrouded killing fields of Panama, but finally the forty eight mile long canal- the brainchild of a French engineer named Ferdinand De Lesseps- was completed by the Americans, and officially opened on August 15th, 1914, by which date Europe was already at war,

There are plenty of indolent sea days en route

There are plenty of indolent sea days en route

Today, the legacy of Panama’s genesis is one of the most amazing travel experiences on offer anywhere today, an astonishing, eight hour passage through a panoply of dense, rolling tracts of jungle that tumbles down to the waters’ edge on both sides. As your ship gradually rises and falls more than eighty feet as it is threaded gingerly through a series of gigantic locks, the air all around you is a live with the sound of chattering, humming and screeching local birds and wildlife; it really is an all out visual and vocal assault on the senses.

Essentially, most Panama transits take place as part of relocating cruises. In spring, many cruise ships relocate from Miami to Los Angeles, from their winter Caribbean cruise grounds to the popular Alaska summer runs. In the autumn, they relocate the other way. Either way, these cruises- which always of necessity involve a full transit of Panama- take between thirteen and fourteen days.

Either way, it’s a pretty exhilarating adventure, swapping the indolent playgrounds of the Caribbean for the sparkling, sun splashed waters of the Pacific, where the sunsets defy belief. Whichever direction you sail in, you’ll stop off at such places as beautiful Huatulco on the Mexican side, as well as famously feisty and fun Cabo San Lucas, with the soaring Los Arcos rock formations, and its internationally famous freewheeling, fun vibe.

On the other side, after that spectacular, stand out transit of Panama proper, you might stop in at breezy, Spanish accented Cartagena, before heading north to either Miami or Fort Lauderdale. In between, reckon on quite a few relaxing sea days to just kick back and soak up that delightful tropical sun.

Parrots of Panama

Parrots of Panama

Typically, Florida to California (westbound) Panama cruises sail in the spring, with eastbound trips running from September onward. With that in mind, here’s my pick of some of the best cruises, running in both directions, over the course of 2014.

ROYAL CARIBBEAN has four transits of Panama announced, all of them on the 70,000 ton, recently revitalised Legend Of The Seas. Eastbound dates: April 1 and November 30.  The two westbound departures are on March 17 and November 15.

More upscale? Sassy CELEBRITY CRUISES has no less than seven Panama transits on its roster. The classically styled Celebrity Century sails westbound on both January 5 and March 6, and eastbound on January 20.

Her larger, more contemporary fleet mate, Celebrity Infinity, also offers a tempting quartet of options. She sails westbound on March 30 and again on November 4, and has eastbound crossings available on April 14 and November 19.

NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINE is the pioneer of Freestyle Cruising, and the line has no less than four ships making Panama transits next year. Here’s how the four ships line up;

Norwegian Pearl: westbound on April 18; eastbound on October 3.

Norwegian Star: westbound on October 20 and November 17. Eastbound on April 20 and November 3.

Norwegian Sun: westbound on April 28; eastbound on November 4.

Norwegian Jewel: westbound (from New Orleans) on April 20. Eastbound (to Houston) on September 25.

Any of these options will provide you with a good, solid cruise experience. The one essential recommendation I would make is that, if you are going to go to all the trouble of embarking on a Panama Canal adventure, then it is definitely worth booking a balcony cabin.

Enjoy!